Orange Olive Oil Mini Cakes with Orange Buttercream

I am pretty proud of myself right now, I have come a long way over the past year of blogging. When I first started I absolutely hated baking. The reason was that it dirties too many dishes, and everything has to be exact and you can’t just add some more of this or that at the last minute to make it better. But, over the last year of having to measure everything, write down what I am doing, actually set timers, and making things more than once I have come to realize that washing a few extra dishes and measuring with a measuring spoon instead of my palm isn’t really that bad. In fact, I have even found it quite therapeutic recently, (OMG, who am I?).Orange Olive Oil Mini Cake |Glitter It Gold

So, I bring you Orange and Olive Oil Mini Cakes with Orange Buttercream, because mini everything is better, and they are personal sized. I had Easter dinner in mind when making these, like picture the Easter table decorated all pretty, like my mother law does with these pretty vintage pastel plates, with each place setting having it’s own little three tier cake sitting on the plate. HOW CUTE!!!Orange Olive Oil Mini Cake |Glitter It Gold

I still have no idea what our plans are for Easter, I just hope that they involve me serving these pretty little things. Oh, and did I mention how incredibly delicious they are?! These are so moist and tender and fluffy. They just melt in your mouth and make it hard to have the self control not to have a second cake. (A second WHOLE CAKE because they are miniaturized personal cakes. Don’t do it. Or maybe do, whatever, it’s a holiday.)Orange Olive Oil Mini Cake |Glitter It Gold

Make sure that you use a Premium Blend Olive Oil, it’s not like you get hit with a strong olive oil flavor in the cake, they are subtle, but still there. I used a more fruity olive oil for this cake as opposed to a grassy or peppery oil- just read the label as most will give you tasting notes.Orange Olive Oil Mini Cake |Glitter It Gold

If you don’t have the energy that I had to make these (layering and frosting 16 mini cakes is time consuming and tedious) then you could totally leave them as cupcakes and pipe on the frosting and they would still be super cute, you could top with some orange zest to make them pretty. Or just leave them as a single cake with multiple layers. SO MANY OPTIONS! Orange Olive Oil Mini Cake |Glitter It GoldTo assemble the mini tiered cakes you will need to use a bread knife to gently cut of rounded top part of each muffin off so that the top is level. Then cut each muffin in half. Each mini cake gets three tiers, to make them even use all top sections for half and all bottom sections for the other half. Put a heaping spoonful on top of the bottom tier, gently press the second layer, repeat for the top layer and gently press so that filling lightly squishes out the sides. Put another glob on the very top and use an offset frosting spatula to smooth out the top and the sides. I used less frosting to give it a “naked” look, but you could make it thicker to fully cover the cake if you want.

Orange Olive Oil Mini Cake |Glitter It Gold
Orange Olive Oil Cake with Orange Buttercream
Print Recipe
This olive oil cake is super light, fluffy, and moist and makes the perfect spring dessert. Any type of citrus can be used.
Servings Prep Time
16 cakes 30 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
16 cakes 30 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Orange Olive Oil Mini Cake |Glitter It Gold
Orange Olive Oil Cake with Orange Buttercream
Print Recipe
This olive oil cake is super light, fluffy, and moist and makes the perfect spring dessert. Any type of citrus can be used.
Servings Prep Time
16 cakes 30 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Servings Prep Time
16 cakes 30 minutes
Cook Time
15 minutes
Ingredients
Cake
Orange Buttercream
Servings: cakes
Instructions
Cake
  1. Preheat the oven to 350. Spray olive oil to coat the inside of a muffin pan and set aside.
  2. In a stand mixer beat the eggs and the sugar until pale yellow and thick ribbons form, about 5 minutes then add the vanilla and beat for 30 seconds.
  3. Combine the dry ingredients in another bowl, and combine orange juice, orange zest, buttermilk and olive oil in a third bowl.
  4. Mixing on low speed, add a third of the dry ingredients, then a third of the wet. Continue adding 1/3 at a time until all ingredients are incorporated. After the last addition be careful not to over mix. The batter will be thin.
  5. Using a 1/4c measuring cup fill the muffin tin with 1/4 c of batter in each cavity. Bake for 11-15 minutes, or until the edges just start to pull away from the pan and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.
  6. Set the pan on a cooling rack for at least 10 minutes, once the cakes can easily be removed from the pan then put them on a wire cooling rack to cool completely before decorating.
Orange Buttercream
  1. In a stand mixer with the whisk attachment beat the butter for about 3 minutes until it is pale yellow. Add 1 cup of confectioners sugar and mix until incorporated.
  2. Add the orange juice, zest and vanilla and beat to incorporate. Add the remaining confectioners sugar 1/4 cup at a time until desired consistency is reached.
  3. To assemble the mini tiered cakes you will need to use a bread knife to gently cut of rounded top part of each muffin off so that the top is level. Then cut each muffin in half. Each mini cake gets three tiers, to make them even use all top sections for half and all bottom sections for the other half. Put a heaping spoonful on top of the bottom tier, gently press the second layer, repeat for the top layer and gently press so that filling lightly squishes out the sides. Put another glob on the very top and use an offset frosting spatula to smooth out the top and the sides. I used less frosting to give it a "naked" look, but you could make it thicker to fully cover the cake if you want.
Recipe Notes

Cake recipe slightly adapted from Better Homes and Gardens.

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Traditional Spanish Tortilla

While living in Spain during my study abroad semester I traveled, became comfortable communicating in Spanish, deepened my independence, made new friends, discovered new joys and interests, and got very homesick. One of the things I had a difficult time with was the food. While the food in Spain is delicious, it lacked the variety that I have become accustomed to living in Southern California, not only was I used to having Mexican, Italian, Chinese, American, and Vietnamese food all within a few days, it’s also hard to beat the variety of fresh and organic produce available here. I cooked occasionally for my host parents, but I discovered that the food I missed most were dishes I did not know how to make. Things that mom and grandma always made for me like grandma’s Pho, and mom’s spagetti. I began searching for a new comfort food, something that would be the chicken soup of my Spain experience.
Traditional Spanish Tortilla | Glitter It Gold
Traditional Spanish Tortilla | Glitter It Gold
It is ironic that the food I found to be my new comfort food is a very traditional Spanish dish with nothing American about it- tortilla. I find it funny that while in Spain I was homesick for America, but now that I have been back for 5 years, I find myself sometimes feeling homesick for Spain. Homesick for the food, the culture, the history, the architecture, the excitement of living somewhere foreign and having probably fewer worries than I will ever have again. The same food that comforted me in Spain, continues to comfort me and remind me of that wonderful time in my life.Traditional Spanish Tortilla | Glitter It Gold
The ingredients and preparation seem simple enough, but the key to making tortilla as good as my host mom did is in the details. You may be tempted to slightly alter the recipe, or maybe skip or change a step that seems unimportant, but don’t. The results just won’t be the same, trust me on this. I have been trying for 5 years to make this with less olive oil, without letting it rest, slicing in cubes using a sharp knife and a cutting board, and I tried boiling the potatoes first, don’t do it. Just follow the steps my host mom gave me to a “T.”Traditional Spanish Tortilla | Glitter It Gold
One of the steps I regularly skipped until I realized it’s importance is the way the potatoes are cut. I used to watch my host mom make tortilla and think “why doesn’t she use a cutting board, and WHY is that knife so dull?” I knew they couldn’t afford nice kitchen ware, but it seemed a little too simplistic and even outdated to me to do it like that. But, as it turns out, there’s a method to the madness. I could go on explaining the chemistry of starches and how this makes sense, but, to make a long story short, creating the roughest edge possible on the potato is key to getting the right texture so that it crisps slightly but doesn’t brown and absorbs some of the egg. Why do you not want the potato to brown? I DON”T know, but my host mom said so, and I have learned through trial and error to just take her word for it when it comes to making tortilla. This seemingly simple dish is nothing but simple. The method has been refined over decades, and some things are just better left as they are. Delicious.
Traditional Spanish Tortilla
Print Recipe
A very traditional Spanish Tortilla with potato and egg. The perfect comfort food for when I get that homesick feeling for Spain.
Servings Prep Time
1 5
Cook Time Passive Time
10 20
Servings Prep Time
1 5
Cook Time Passive Time
10 20
Traditional Spanish Tortilla
Print Recipe
A very traditional Spanish Tortilla with potato and egg. The perfect comfort food for when I get that homesick feeling for Spain.
Servings Prep Time
1 5
Cook Time Passive Time
10 20
Servings Prep Time
1 5
Cook Time Passive Time
10 20
Ingredients
Servings:
Instructions
  1. Using a dull knife (if a butter knife works, then great) slice part way into the potato then rotate the knife to break off a chunk of it, about 1/2" cubish. The pieces should all be odd shaped and have rough edges. Salt generously.
  2. Place the potatoes in a non stick skillet and just barely cover with olive oil, bring to a simmer. After a few minutes, add the onion. Cook until the potatoes are soft but NOT brown.
  3. Drain the potatoes and onion, reserving the oil. My host mom strained the oil through a paper towel and saved it in the fridge for use in another dish, just remember that the oil now has salt in it. Let the potato and onion sit in the colander draining and cooling for about 10 minutes. Take a taste and add more salt if needed.
  4. Meanwhile, scramble 3 eggs with the water. Gently mix the potato and onion into the egg and let it sit for another 10 minutes.
  5. Check the mixture, some of the egg will have been absorbed into the potatoes, so add another if needed to get your preferred consistency. I like mine not as eggy.
  6. Pour about 1 TBS of olive oil back into the skillet and set to medium-high heat. Fill the skillet half way up with potato mixture and cook until halfway set and the bottom is just beginning to brown. Place a plate on top of the skillet and very carefully flip the skillet over and the mixture onto the plate. Slide the potatoes back into the skillet with the uncooked side down and continue to cook until the bottom browns and the egg is cooked. The center should still be slightly soft. Slice into wedges and serve warm.
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